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NDI

The National Democratic Institute is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to support and strengthen democratic institutions worldwide through citizen participation, openness and accountability in government.

Washington Blade | Link to story  » More than 150 people attended a panel discussion in the Colombian capital on Thursday that discussed how out politicians and elected officials can advance the LGBT rights movement in Colombia and in the United States.
Washington Post | Link to story  » What can and should be done to increase women’s access to technology in the world, and, once they have access to it, where does empowerment stop and manipulation begin?
Chicago Tribune | Link to story  » Ghana's Supreme Court must decide in the coming months whether or not to overturn December elections that handed the presidency to John Mahama, in a rare case of African judicial vigour that has transfixed the country.
IWPR | Link to story  » An innovative radio series in Libya is allowing people to connect with members of parliament and other public officials, and increasing the scope for dialogue around critical issues of political transition. By the end of June 2013, 19 programmes will have gone out. IWPR has partnered with the National Democratic Institute on some of the programmes, which are being funded by USAID and the British Foreign Office.
Cambodia Daily | Link to story  » The Washington-based National Democratic Institute (NDI) on Tuesday defended its recent audit of the voter list for July’s national election and told the National Election Committee (NEC) that it had not understood the audit’s findings when criticizing it.
Wall Street Journal | Link to story  » International election observers on Monday said Pakistan's elections were a success and a step forward for the country, despite accusations by losing politicians of vote-rigging in many areas.
Express Tribune | Link to story  » In their bid to sabotage the historic May 11 polls, the Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) and other outlawed militant groups are likely to target the leaders of political parties, foreign election observers, polling staff and journalists. The militant groups are carrying out their plans with the backing of foreign countries.
The Wall Street Journal | Link to story» The outcome of Saturday's Pakistani elections won't just determine the next civilian government: It will also test the idea that the country's powerful military has pulled back from manipulating politics and accepted democracy.
The Washington Post | Link to story» Bomb blasts tore through two campaign events in northwestern Pakistan on Tuesday, killing at least 18 people, authorities said, as attacks ahead of Saturday’s national election continued against liberal politicians as well as a pro-Taliban Islamist party.
Daily Nation | Link to story» Three groups which helped the electoral commission prepare for the March 4 polls have told the US Congress that the elections were credible.