image of a compass
NDI

The National Democratic Institute is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to support and strengthen democratic institutions worldwide through citizen participation, openness and accountability in government.

NDI Mourns the Passing of Abner Mikva

Abner Mikva

Photo Credit: Kate Gardiner

The National Democratic Institute (NDI) mourns the passing of Abner Mikva, who served his country in all three branches of government -- as a Congressman from the Chicago area, as chief judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia and as White House counsel under President Clinton. "Ab Mikva represented my hometown in Illinois," said NDI President Kenneth Wollack.

NDI representatives with Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina

NDI representatives Amitabha Ghosh, Deborah Healy, Peter Manikas, Sarah Dickson and Ivan Doherty, pose for a photo with Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina.

Senior NDI representatives met in Dhaka with the honorable prime minister of Bangladesh, Sheikh Hasina, last month. The delegation was in Dhaka to discuss recent developments and the Institute’s programs in Bangladesh. The delegation met with the prime minister privately after attending an Iftar -- a meal eaten after sunset during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan -- at her residence.

Election Date: 
August 2016
NDI Activities Planned?: 
Kagadi, Kakumiro, Rubanda, and Omoro Districts
Election Date: 
7/30/2016
NDI Activities Planned?: 
Kano and Rivers States
Election Date: 
7/23/2016
NDI Activities Planned?: 
Kogi and Imo States
3fatemapic.jpg

Fatema Jafari, a member of the Herat Provincial Council and 2016 National Endowment for Democracy (NED) fellow, recently visited NDI’s headquarters in Washington, D.C., to discuss her experience in Afghan politics. Fatema first entered the political sphere in Afghanistan’s 2009 provincial council elections to promote women’s rights and advocate for key issues in her province, including public health. She was re-elected in the 2014 provincial council elections.

Ukraine Campaign Schools Yuriy Trainer Quote
In 2013, Ukrainians took to the street to reject the corruption, injustice and disrespect for human rights that characterized the regime of then President Viktor Yanukovych. The series of protests that began on Maidan Nezalezhnosti (Independence Square) became known as the Revolution of Dignity. Inspired to take Ukraine’s reform into their own hands, thousands of activists across Ukraine seized a unique opportunity to run for elected office for the first time.
Author: 
Institute for Democracy, Peace, and Security (IUDPAS)
Publisher: 
National Democratic Institute
Published Date: 
05/01/2016
Resource Type: 
Public Opinion Research
Language: 
Spanish

A 2016 public perceptions survey on insecurity and victimization conducted by the Institute for Democracy, Peace, and Security (Instituto Universitario en Democracia Paz y Seguridad, IUDPAS) of the Autonomous University of Honduras (Universidad Autónoma de Honduras, UNAH), with technical assistance from NDI. The national study was conducted in all of Honduras' 18 departments between February and March 2016 and included a total of 1,192 interviews.

A 2016 public perceptions survey on insecurity and victimization conducted by the Institute for Democracy, Peace, and Security (Instituto Universitario en Democracia Paz y Seguridad, IUDPAS) of the Autonomous University of Honduras (Universidad Autónoma de Honduras, UNAH), with technical assistance from NDI. The national study was conducted in all of Honduras' 18 departments between February and March 2016 and included a total of 1,192 interviews.

Author: 
National Democratic Institute
Publisher: 
National Democratic Institute
Published Date: 
06/24/2016
Resource Type: 
Newsletter

Author: 
National Democratic Institute
Publisher: 
National Democratic Institute
Published Date: 
04/01/2016
Resource Type: 
Public Opinion Research
Language: 
English

In January 2016, Tunisians marked the fifth anniversary of the citizen-led uprising that toppled the regime of authoritarian leader Ben Ali. More than a year after the parliament and president took office following elections in fall 2014, Tunisia’s elected leaders are endeavoring to address the country’s pressing economic and security challenges while consolidating its young democracy. The 217-member parliament, the Assembly of People’s Representatives (ARP), which first convened in December 2014, has made progress on several legislative priorities, but has also struggled with political infighting and a lack of resources and staffing. With significant economic reforms still forthcoming, most Tunisians continue to feel that the gains of the revolution have yet to meaningfully impact their daily lives. Amidst commemorations of the anniversary of the revolution in Tunis, demonstrations—strikingly similar to those in 2011—spread through the interior regions following the death of an unsuccessful job seeker in Kasserine.

As the transition progresses, local elections are Tunisia’s next step towards elected, representative governance at all levels. For the first time in their history, Tunisians will democratically elect the municipal and regional councilors whose decisions directly impact their communities. At the time the research was conducted, municipal elections were expected to be held by the end of 2016; Chafik Sarsar, president of the High Independent Authority for Elections (ISIE), has since announced a date of March 27, 2017. Additional delays are possible, however, as an electoral law—which would set the framework for the election of local and regional councils—is still in progress. To bring the current electoral law in line with the constitution, the law would divide the entire Tunisian territory into municipalities, enabling all citizens to vote in municipal elections. The government is concurrently preparing legislation that will create a framework for the decentralization process, which it will submit to parliament in the coming months. The Code des collectivités locales [Law on local authorities] is expected to grant new prerogatives to heads of municipalities and to local and regional councils, but as the decentralization process will likely be ongoing for years, a limited number of powers may be devolved to local officials by the elections. 

In January 2016, Tunisians marked the fifth anniversary of the citizen-led uprising that toppled the regime of authoritarian leader Ben Ali. More than a year after the parliament and president took office following elections in fall 2014, Tunisia’s elected leaders are endeavoring to address the country’s pressing economic and security challenges while consolidating its young democracy.